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California kindergarten students can take cannabis to school, court rules

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Court says a kindergartner can bring cannabis to school

The oil is used for the treatment of epileptic seizures.

A 5-year-old California girl can continue to bring a cannabis-based drug-to-school—used for emergency treatment of a rare form of epilepsy—a judge ruled Friday.

The right side of the family of Brooke Adams, who participated in the kindergarten in Santa Rosa.

The Rincon Valley Union School District had asked for a ban on the ointment of the school, because it contains the active ingredient in marijuana.

Officials said, making Adams the use of the drug at school would be state and federal laws barring medical marijuana on school grounds.

In California, the medical use of marijuana in private with a doctor’s recommendation is legal. A total of 30 states and the District of Columbia allow medical marijuana use.

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The judge’s temporary allowed the young girl to start school in August, while the district’s objections were considered. A nurse will accompany Adams to school and had to apply the oil three times for the treatment of epilepsy.

On this Monday, July 23, 2018, photo minutes before having a seizure, Brooke Adams, 5, plays with her toys with her mother, Jana, in their home in Santa Rosa, California.

(AP)

Judge Charles Marson made to be permanent on the Friday. Marson is a judge in the state office of Administrative Hearings Special Education Division, which handles disagreements between school districts and parents of children with disabilities.

“I was so overwhelmed by the emotion and joy that we no longer fight after a battle of more than two years,” Jana Adams, the mother of the girl, told the Associated Press.

“They can just go to school like any other child and we do not need to keep pushing to get what they need,” says her mother added.

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Joe Rogoway, the family’s lawyer said that he hopes the ruling opens the door for other students who say that they need to use a cannabis-based drug on the campus for medical reasons.

District officials said they were reviewing the decision and have not decided yet whether to appeal. Assistant Director Cathy Myhers said the district is relieved that the legal guidance on the issue.

“We are pleased with the decision and guidance,” Myhers said. “We are pleased to have a decision that supports our ability to teach and serve these students in our public schools.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Christopher Carbone is a reporter and news editor covering science and technology for FoxNews.com. He can be reached at christopher.carbone@foxnews.com. Follow him on Twitter @christocarbone.

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