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Breathing polluted air is more deadly than previously believed, a new study claims

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With the increasing levels of pollution throughout the world are increasing the odds that people are going to die prematurely, according to a major new study.

The New England Journal of Medicine, examined the levels of fine particulate matter and daily mortality in 652 cities in 24 countries over the course of three decades. It is considered to be the world’s largest international study on the short-term effects of air pollution on mortality.

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Even though scientists know that breathing polluted air is bad for your health and can cause damage to a person’s lungs and heart and increasing the risk of a certain disease, the NEJM study, however, even small amounts of dust can have a negative impact.

According to the study, two of the countries that saw the greatest increase in mortality when air pollution levels are up and gone in Australia and Brazil. In the latter, it has recently been spotted in the Amazon rain forest to burn at a much faster pace than you normally would.

Pollution from coal-fired power plants will contribute to a wide range of health problems. (AP Photo/Darko Vojinovic, File)

The brazilian president, Jair Bolsonaro wants to be the Amazon river, to the mining industry and other sectors, making them vulnerable to farmers and to developers who want to “slash-and-burn in the forest to clear the land.

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The mortality rate has increased by .68% for particulate matter in the study, and the researchers said that the increase is significant in the study of the major towns and cities.

“If we’re looking at a population of about one million people in a city, well, 1% is very important, and it can have an effect on a lot of people,” Eric Lavigne, co-author of the study, told The Verge. Lavigne is an associate professor at the University of Ottawa and a senior epidemiologist at Canada’s Public Health Agency.

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