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Boy Scouts blocked boy with Down’s Syndrome from becoming Eagle Scout, says lawsuit

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Utah father sues Boy Scouts of America

Father accuses group to discriminate against his son, who has Down syndrome. Alicia Acuna has more of the case.

The father of a boy with Down’s syndrome filed a lawsuit last week accusing the Boy Scouts of America of allegedly blocking his son to be an Eagle Scout and the revocation of his 22 merit badges, he worked for two years to earn.

Logan Blythe, 15, is a scout by the National Parks Board in Utah, and is able to advance in the ranks because the council has made accommodations, when necessary, his father, Chad, said.

The teenager was plan to make kits for the special needs of the babies his Eagle project when the family came in November, the national organization will expire every merit badge he obtained. Chad Blythe told The Washington Post on Tuesday he heard the news in an e-mail.

“I was asked to suspend Logan’s Eagle Project approval,” the e-mail listed. “Please do not more work on his project.”

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The family sued the Boy Scouts and the Utah National Parks Council for the “outrageous and reckless conduct.”

In the suit, they demanded the Boy Scouts of America “suitable for Logan and provide for damages of at least $1.”

Chad Blythe told me that his son was “distraught” after learning he was blocked from becoming an Eagle Scout.

“He was disappointed. Pain. You could see in his manner that he was not happy,” the father told the magazine. “Since then we have only been able to get him to wear his scout uniform once. He won’t even close. He looks visibly upset when we talk about this.”

Chad told Fox News his son has stopped meeting, and felt he should have been able to get the badges.

“This particular boy, this is just as much as he can. Let’s accept that and give him the badge. Why? Because he tried his best,” he said.

The Boy Scouts said that it worked with the council and the Blythe family to offer “alternative merit badges” and a path to become an Eagle. A spokesman of the organisation told the People that Logan was still considered a boy scout and his badges were not to be destroyed.

“He was disappointed. The evil does.”

– Chad Blythe

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However, Chad Blythe told The Washington Post that the organization has not contacted the family and would not respond to his e-mails. He said that he got a lot of support from the public after the news.

“If we can change and make something positive come of all this, then the next child … not to do what we do now,” Chad Blythe said. “And they will not be hurt and disappointed in the way Logan has disappointed.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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