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Boeing-Starliner spacecraft to return to Earth after a failed mission

to connectVideoBoeing the Starliner hits, snake in the grass, not on International Space Station

Boeing’s unmanned aerial vehicles Starliner capsule to be suffering from a computer problem that after a successful launch from Florida, Phil Keating reports.

Boeing’s new Starliner spacecraft is set to land at the kennedy space center, Fla., on Sunday morning, the day after the us mission has failed because of the capsule’s clock was set incorrectly, and the capsule ended up in the wrong job.

The Starliner was launched by an Atlas V rocket Friday morning, but the capsule ‘ s clock is not synchronized with the timing of the launch. The Highlight of the “I have a Mission Elapsed Time (met) is the deviation of the spacecraft in order to believe that it is in an orbital insertion burn, and if it’s not,” NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine tweeted shortly after the launch.

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Because #Starliner in an orbital insertion burn (or burning) the dead bands have been reduced, and the spacecraft will burn more fuel than expected to keep accurate control,” he added. “This (exclude @Space_Station rendez-vous.”

A source with knowledge of the case told Fox News on Friday that the Atlas rocket performed as it’s supposed to, and the place of the Starliner in orbit.

The room filed with just a test dummy in order to prepare for a flight with a real crew, for next year, the Starliner, it was the intention to spend a week at the International space station. Because of the accident, the capsule was launched into the wrong orbit shortly after its launch. The docking station has been torn down, and the Boeing and NASA have decided to take the spacecraft home as soon as possible.

THE BEER IS IN A JOB, AND THE REASON FOR THE SPACE IS THE NEW FRONTIER FOR ALCOHOL

“We started out with the clock set to the wrong time,” Jim Chilton, vice president of Boeing, said on Saturday. “As a result of the starting of the clock at the wrong time, the spacecraft will reach the space, and thought that she may be in line with the mission and autonomy, began to be worn.”

A United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket that Boeing Starliner crew capsule on an Orbital Flight Test to the International Space Station to depart from Space Launch Complex-41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force station, Friday, Dec. 20, 2019 at the latest, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. In the Starliner spaceship, not on the right track.(AP Photo/Terry Reindeer)

Hordes of people take a look at the Starliner’s flight from taking off from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in the last week. It was visible for at least five minutes, but when the news of the problem began to emerge, the mood soon turned out to be negative. NASA officials have delayed the Boeing configuration.

Boeing, which has been working on the Starliner, and since 2010, has been awarded a $4-billion contract by NASA in 2014 to work on the Starliner, as it looks to compete with SpaceX, NASA’s commercial crew provider (isp).

Boeing-Starliner capsule makes it’s debut launch to the International space station

In March, the Elon Musk-led company has successfully completed a similar demonstration. SpaceX has a fence, a run, stop the test, prior to the inclusion of two NASA astronauts aboard the Dragon capsule, which could happen as soon as in the spring, by the year 2020.

“A job is hard work,” SpaceX founder and chief executive Elon Musk said in a tweet to Boeing. “We wish you a happy landing and a quick recovery to the next mission.”

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It’s been almost three years since NASA astronauts to be launched from within the united states, The last time it was on the 8th of July 2011, when Atlantis, now on display at the Kennedy Space Center of the last space shuttle flight.

Since then, NASA astronauts have traveled to and from the international space station, via Kazakhstan, courtesy of the Russian Space Agency, costing the space agency $86 million of euro per one-way trip.

Fox News’ Chris Ciaccia and James Rogers and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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