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Boeing 737 Max: In the simulation, pilots had 40 seconds to solve error that can doom a plane, report says

connectVideoEthiopian Airlines, jet crashes on way to Kenya

Trey Yingst reports from Jerusalem.

In flight simulations are designed to the problems of a doomed Boeing 737 Max aircraft, the pilots found that they had less than 40 seconds for the overwrite of a controversial automated system and prevent an accident, according to The New York Times.

The Boeing 737 Max is grounded worldwide after the crash of an Ethiopian Airlines flight on 10 March, which killed 157 people, including eight Americans. The plane crashed just six minutes after the start of the Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa.

In October last year, a Boeing 737 Max operated by Lion Air crashed, take a dip in the sea shortly after take-off in Indonesia. Crash data from the Ethiopian Airlines tragedy allegedly shows “obvious similarities” between the two accidents.

ETHIOPIAN AIRLINES CRASH DATA SHOWS ‘CLEAR AGREEMENTS’ WITH LION AIR ACCIDENT, SAYS MINISTER OF TRANSPORT

After the crash, the Boeing 737 Max is the anti-stall software Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System (mcas) is in the spotlight — the software can adjust the pitch of the plane the nose down in a number of cases to keep from stalling, which speculated that it contributed to both accidents.

In this March 13, 2019, file photo, people work in the cockpit of a Boeing 737 MAX 8 aircraft is being built for the TUI Group parked next to another MAX 8 has also been designated for TUI with Boeing Co.’s Renton Factory in Renton, Wash.
(AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, file)

Citing two people involved in the test simulations of the Lion Air crash, The New York Times reports that the software as originally designed and explained, with little margin for error.

In the simulation, the system is activated after a single sensor has failed and the pilots had to react quickly to avoid a “fatal dive,” according to the New York Times.

BOEING, THE FAA QUESTIONED THE SAFETY OF THE 737 MAX SAFETY DAYS FOR ETHIOPIAN AIRLINES CRASH

While the pilots in the test were able to successfully shut the system off and land safely, they did so with prior knowledge of how the controversial system will work.

Boeing has promised to update the software and provide additional training for pilots.

“Soon we will also release a software update, and related pilot training for the 737 MAX, which will cause discovered in the aftermath of the Lion Air Flight 610 accident,” said Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg in a letter to airlines, passengers and the aviation industry. “We have been working in full cooperation with the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration, the u.s. Department of Transportation and the National Transportation Safety Board on all matters relating to both the Lion Air, and Ethiopian Airlines accidents since Lion Air accident in October last year.”

ETHIOPIAN AIRLINE DEFENDS PILOTS TRAINING

The Federal Aviation Administration expects that Boeing the update of this week, according to the Associated Press, which reports that the company has invited more than 200 pilots, technical experts and regulators are factory in Renton, Wash., for a briefing.

As part of the update, Boeing said that the tweaking of the anti-stall software. After the update, the system will be based on data from more than one sensor for automatically pushes the plane’s nose lower. The system does not repeatedly push the nose down, and it reduces the size of the change.

Boeing said that it will pay to train pilots. Additional training to be done on the computer, not on a plane or in a flight simulator is designed for drilling into house for pilots how they can override the software if it is involved unnecessarily.

BOEING’S NEW 737 MAX AIRCRAFT TAKES ITS FIRST FLIGHT

The Boeing 737 Max, which is the fourth generation of the 737, took his first flight in a blaze of publicity in January 2016.

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Fox News has reached Boeing and the FAA with requests for comment on this story.

Fox News’ Katherine Lamb, Anna Hopkins, and The Associated Press contributed to this article.

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