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Before Kavanaugh’s confirmation vote, Sen. Collins 3,000 hanger receives from anti-abortion activists

Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, speaks with Supreme Court nominee judge Brett Kavanaugh in her office before a private meeting on Capitol Hill in Washington, on Tuesday, Aug. 21, 2018.

(AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

After a week of controversial hearings for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, the focus shifted to the swing voters in the Senate and the crucial role they play in the confirmation process.

One of the lawmakers on the hot seat before the vote, Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, the weigh-in recently, a particularly unusual gift, received, in an effort to have your opinion.

A package of 3,000 coat hangers back arrived in Collins’ office in Washington, DC-icon-alley abortions that took place before she became legal with the 1973 Roe v. Wade decision — in the hope of convincing the pro-choice senator to vote against them Brett Kavanaugh’s Supreme Court confirmation.

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Collins, a centrist Republican, fought the GOP effort to junk the Affordable Care Act, is one of the few Republicans in the sights of activists, in the hope to block Kavanaugh of the participation of the Bank, since abortion has become a front-and-center issue in the debate on the judge.

Democrats argue that the President, Trump picked up Kavanaugh, because he is to overturn the voice of the Roe v. Wade decision. Liberal groups to run TV commercials, the promoting senator of the nomination, reject it.

Activists have also pledged to spend hundreds of thousands of dollars to Finance an opponent, Collins, if you are nominated to vote in favor of the President. She is up for re-election in 2020.

If Collins votes Yes, then it is probably be confirmed. She and Republican Sen. Lisa Murkowski of Alaska – another pro-choice Republican– that would probably have to be both blocked with “no” votes for Kavanaugh.

For its part, Collins has kept mum about how they vote.

Still, you are sending signals that Kavanaugh deleted to tell a hurdle from her, that Roe v. Wade established the right to abortion is settled law. A spokeswoman for Collins said on Saturday that a recent E-Mail from Kavanaugh, in which he denied that all lawyers see the deer — do not contradict what he said to the senator, because he was not expressing his personal views.

“I always wait until after the hearings are completed, before you make a decision, and I will do so also in this case,” Collins said.

Collins, for her part, is following the same process you used with the GOP candidate, John Roberts, Samuel Alito, and Neil from gorsuch and Democratic nominee Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan.

“I voted for justice Sotomayor, and I also voted for justice Alito,” she said, referring to the judge to the opposite ends of the political spectrum. “I respect the fact that one of my jobs is to determine whether or not the candidate has qualified for the court, the necessary experience, and has the judicial temperament, and respect for precedence,” she added.

While they voted against a Supreme Court nominee, Collins has vowed to reject a candidate, which is hostile to the Roe v. Wade decision. She said Kavanaugh told of meeting you during your face-to-face, that he views the 1973 decision established the legal precedent.

But Kavanaugh said in a 2003 E-Mail while working for the government of President George W. Bush, some scholars the idea of precedent can be different and the Supreme Court “always has its precedent overrule.” Kavanaugh, said that the comments reflect his personal views, but “what could the lawyers say.”

Collins voted last month to gain funding for Planned Parenthood a day after the same organization gathered to encourage Washington to cast their votes against Kavanaugh. On Thursday, the group delivered letters to her office in Bangor.

“I’ve learned not to expect a ‘thank you’,” said Collins.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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