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Banned donut-loving bear travels thousands of miles to return home

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A donut-loving bear whose life was spared by the New Hampshire governor Chris Sununu two years ago has made an incredible journey home, after being moved last June.

Dubbed Mink, the Bear, the animal was recently spotted on its home market of Hanover, near Dartmouth College, after they have traveled thousands of miles in an epic voyage back in near the Canadian border.

The condition of the Fish and Game Department had decided to euthanize the female black bear and her three young offspring in 2017, after repeated problems with them feeding on garbage and bird feeders climax with two bears enter a house in Hanover. But after a public call, the Republican Gov. Sununu instead ordered the animals moved.

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The three yearlings were moved from that year, and one of them was killed by a hunter in Quebec, Canada, within a few weeks. The mother bear, called “Mink” by the local population, leaving the city to mate and was not made until last year after she returned with four new cubs last spring. She was tagged, fitted with a tracking collar and moved about 120 miles north of a sparsely populated location near the border with Canada.

FILE – this April 13, 2018 file photo, shows Mink the bear after she had been sedated in Hanover, N. H. After being fitted with a tracking collar, the bear moved to the far north of New Hampshire.
(Jennifer Hauck/Valley News via AP, File)

Last week, Mink made it back to Hanover after a journey of a loop route through New Hampshire.

The bear’s return has garnered a lot of attention. NPR reports that Mink, who is at ease with people, was popular to some of Hanover and the residents for her move. An elderly man, for example, fed her maple-glazed donuts. The other residents were, however, less enamored of the animal, which officials to remove her from the area.

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Mink is now something of a social media celebrity. “Someone can just set up a #GoFundMe page for this bear so she can just be fed with a maple donut a day?,” tweeted Brian Wolfe on the 15 May.

Some users also expressed their concern for the bear’s well-being. “This makes me sad. I hope the wildlife people have Mink is back”, tweeted Oceana Lizard.

There is even a Twitter account dedicated to Mink. “If y’all could shoot me that would be great,” the tweeted on May 16, with a link to a Change.org a petition titled “Please Don’t Kill Mink’. The petition has accumulated more than 2,400 signatures.

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Andrew Timmins, the bear project leader with the New Hampshire Fish and game Department, said Monday that he is in regular contact with the governor’s office and a local bear rehabilitator — and all agree that there is no need to take further action at this time.

A map showing Mink of the bear’s travel.
(New Hampshire Fish and game)

“This bear has to show us where she wants to, so let’s see if we can do better to live together with her more vigilant with food attractants,” Timmins said.

Fox News has New Hampshire, the Fish and Game Department with a request for additional comment on this story.

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The range of the American black bear, or Ursus Americanus, covers the largest part of the North American continent, according to the National Wildlife Federation. “They are found in Alaska, much of Canada and the adjacent United States, and extend as far south as the north of Mexico,” explains on her website. “They can just live where they find food, but mostly occur where there are trees.”

In most places In the USA, the black bear population is stable or increasing, according to the National Park Service.

The International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List also notes that the American black bear population has increased, and classifies the species as of “least concern.”

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The Associated Press contributed to this article. Follow James Rogers on Twitter @jamesjrogers

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