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As Hurricane Florence barrels toward US, ‘worst case scenario’ simulation of a Category 4 storm shows the catastrophic destruction

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Catastrophic flooding is expected from Florence

Fox News senior meteorologist Janice Dean reports from New York.

A 15-foot storm surge, up to nine inches of rainfall in some areas, cases, lines, and the large-scale power outages would be under the devastating results of a Category 4 hurricane striking the Mid-Atlantic region of the head, a recent simulation storm by FEMA closed.

A few months ago, disaster planners with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and Argonne National Laboratory simulated a fictitious Category 4 hurricane rolled into southeastern Virginia and the Chesapeake Bay to strike the capital of the nation – alarmingly similar to the real-world scenario now unfolding on the dangerous vulnerable piece of the east coast with Hurricane Florence.

HURRICANE FLORENCE PATH: THE TRACK OF THE STORM HERE

“What they were trying to do was crate a worst-case scenario, but it is a very realistic scenario,” said Joshua Behr, research professor at Virginia’s Old Dominion University who are involved in disaster modeling and simulations.

The FEMA study was of a “national level exercise” in at the end of April and beginning of May that the senior leaders of the White House, along with more than 91 federal departments and agencies.

Simulated Cone graphics forecast for the Hurricane Cora, used for the 2018 National Level Exercise. This is NOT a real hurricane, but is used for the testing of our nation’s preparedness for the hurricane effects.

(FEMA)

The devastating damage of the fictional “Hurricane Cora” has a number of experts are concerned that Hurricane Florence – Category 4 storm rolled on the Mid-Atlantic region of the Carolinas right in her eyes.

From 8 pm, Wednesday, Florence is approximately 530 kilometres south-southeast of Cape Fear, North Carolina with maximum sustained winds of 130 km / h. Experts are concerned the hurricane could produce a catastrophe similar to the 2005 Hurricane Katrina in a part of the country that is even difficult to evacuate.

HURRICANE FLORENCE WOULD BRING CATASTROPHIC STORM SURGES: WHAT ARE THEY AND HOW CAN YOU PREPARE?

The National Hurricane Center said Florence would bring storm surges upwards of nine feet in most areas around the coastline and up to 13 feet in the areas between Cape Fear and Cape Lookout, North Carolina. They also forecast up to 40 inches of rainfall in some isolated areas of south Carolina.

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How FEMA is preparing for Hurricane Florence

“What I fear is that the saturation, in combination with a storm, which kind of stalls,” said Behr, who has studied vulnerable populations in the paths of Hurricane Katrina on the Gulf Coast and in the Hampton Roads region.

The disaster planners simulated Hurricane Cora beating of the heart of the Mid-Atlantic region, and the damage up-and-down of the coastal states was catastrophic.

HURRICANE FLORENCE CONTACTS TO BRANDS SUCH AS ‘EXTREMELY DANGEROUS’ STORM HITS EAST COAST

A boarded up house on North Topsail Beach in North Carolina as Hurricane Florence approaches in the distance.

(Tomas Vazquez/Fox News)

The hurricane damaged key roads, making evacuations difficult, knock-out power at the most petrol stations in the region, and hit the hurricane-force winds in three nuclear power plants, is harmful, according to a Department of Energy simulation of the manual.

The make-believe that the hurricane also posed a threat to hundreds of nearby cell towers, and power was knocked out to 135 data centers in Virginia and the other 60 in Maryland.

The Cora scenario projected hurricane-force winds inflicting ‘irreparable damage’ to houses and significant damage to critical infrastructure within a distance of 50 miles away from the hurricane center. The manual makes no mention of dead and wounded, with the emphasis instead of on infrastructure.

PHOTOS: PREPARATIONS FOR HURRICANE FLORENCE

Forecasters with the National Hurricane Center said that while Florence is expected to slow down considerably by late Thursday and Friday, it is still a “very dangerous major hurricane” when there is land in sight.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Lucia I. Suarez Sang a Reporter for FoxNews.com. Follow her on Twitter @luciasuarezsang

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