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Apollo 11 astronaut, Michael Collins, recalls the drinking of the coffee during the lonely Moon landing a job

to connectVideoApollo 11, Michael Collins, to reflect on the historic moon landing: ‘We were just regular astronauts

Michael Collins was thinking about the landing on the moon, refers to himself as an ‘ordinary astronauts’

Michael Collins may not be a household name like his fellow Apollo 11 crew members Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin, but he has played a key role in the success of the epic quest.

When Armstrong and Aldrin were on their famous first steps on the Moon on July 20, 1969, Collins was at 60 km and above them, in line with the mission of the command module.

Each and every time, and the Columbia Command Module in orbit around the Moon, it would lose contact with Mission Control in Houston, texas, for more than 40 minutes at a time. As a result, he has often been described as “the loneliest person in the world.”

APOLLO 11 ASTRONAUT, MICHAEL COLLINS, RECALLS EPIC’S LAUNCH: “WE FELT LIKE THE WEIGHT OF THE WORLD ON OUR SHOULDERS”

This, however, could not be further from the truth, as he said in an interview with Bob Cabana, director of NASA’s Kennedy Space Center on Tuesday. “I was always asked:” I Was the loneliest human being?'” “he told me. “The answer was,” No, I just felt so good.”

1. Neil Armstrong, Apollo 11, 1969: The crew of the Apollo 11 mission-from left, Neil Armstrong, Mission Commander, Michael Collins, Lt.-Colonel, united states air force, and Edwin Eugene Aldrin, known as Buzz Aldrin, USAF Lunar Module pilot. In all, 12 Americans walked on the moon from 1969 to 1972.
(NASA)

Collins, a former U.s. Air Force fighter pilot and experimental test pilot, and had spent a lot of time flying the aircraft itself. In addition, the extensive training undertaken by the Apollo 11 astronauts, that meant that he was very comfortable with the Command Module. “I’m familiar with my surroundings,” he said.

“It was a lot of fun, and I had a nice hot cup of tea, I had the music I wanted,” Collins added. “I have not an iota’s lonely … and it was 40-something minutes of peace and quiet.”

APOLLO 11’S MICHAEL COLLINS, TO REFLECT ON THE HISTORIC MOON LANDING: ‘WE WERE JUST REGULAR ASTRONAUTS

After spending a total of 21 hours and 36 minutes on the Moon, Armstrong and Aldrin, the lunar module lifted off and linked up with Collins and the Command Module for nearly four hours.

A pilot, Michael Collins, the Apollo 11 Command Module, practice and the docking hatch of removal from the CM simulator at NASA’s Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas, June 28, 1969. Image courtesy of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).
(Photo by Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images)

Fifty years after the unbelievable events of the Apollo 11, Collins was a tribute to Armstrong, who passed away in 2012. “It is, Neil, that in most cases I think it is not Neil’s to fly to the Moon and back, even though he said he had a great job as the mission commander.”

On the contrary, phil Collins, reminds us of Armstrong’s incredible ability to share the experiences of the Apollo 11 and subsequent crews to return to Earth. Although it’s something of an introvert, Armstrong’s enthusiastic crowd at a “Giant Leap” for global goodwill tours of the Apollo 11 astronauts and their wives on Sept. 29-Nov. 5, 1969.

APOLLO 11 FLIGHT DIRECTOR, REMEMBERS THAT HISTORIC MISSION TO THE MOON

“He was a brilliant speaker,” he said. “It would have to be the audience the feeling that they had climbed on board the Columbia, with us by the time he was done with his speech.”

Collins, who had been the pilot on the Gemini 10 mission in 1966, he explained that he turned down a chance to become the commander of Apollo 17.

It would be another three years of living in filthy hotels,” he said, pointing out that he doesn’t want to be separated from his “lovely” wife and children.

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In the interview to the Kennedy Space Center’s launch pad 39A, at the monument to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the launch of Apollo 11 on July 16, 1969.

Follow James Rogers on Twitter @jamesjrogers

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