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Amelia Earhart signed document discovered in the attic box

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Document signed by Amelia Earhart discovered in the attic box

An extremely rare document signed by Amelia Earhart that gives details of her ill-fated aircraft has surfaced after half a century hidden in an attic. The document and the corresponding archive is valued at $75,000.

An extremely rare document signed by Amelia Earhart that gives details of her ill-fated aircraft has surfaced after half a century hidden in an attic.

The aviation pioneer filled out the document to the 1936 National Air Races with her famous, but ill-fated Lockheed Electra. Less than a year after competing in the races, Earhart disappeared during an attempt to fly the Lockheed aircraft around the world.

Earhart and navigator Fred Noonan went missing on July 2, 1937 during a flight from Papua-New Guinea to Howland Island in the Pacific ocean. Their fate was one of the greatest mysteries of the 20th century and is still controversial.

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The document is part of an archive of 64 forms completed by the pilots of the era that will be revealed by a historical document dealer, the Raab Collection, on Thursday. This was Earhart, the first and the last national flight in the Lockheed before she tried her circumnavigation of the world.

The archive of the documents (The Raab Collection)

The Earhart document and the associated archive to be valued at $75,000.

The 1936 National Air Races represented a breakthrough event for women pilots, women in big lines in order to compete against the men for the first time, according to the Raab Collection. In addition to Earhart, Jacqueline Cochran, Louise Thaden, Laura Ingalls, Grace Prescott and Helen MacCloskey took part with Thaden winning the prestigious Bendix trophy.

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The Earhart document, in particular, offers a fascinating glimpse into the life of an aviation icon. “It was discovered in a box in the back of an attic,” Nathan Raab, one of the owners of the Raab Collection, told Fox News. The collection is research indicates that there is no other document has ever reached the market, he added.

Earhart lists the details of her ill-fated Lockheed aircraft in the signed document (The Raab collection)

In the document, Earhart lists the technical details of their aircraft, the registration number and date of manufacture – July 20, 1936. “To see Earhart describing her “new” aircraft in such detail is remarkable,” Raab told in the News.

The archive of the original owner gave it as a gift to a colleague with more than 50 years ago, according to the Raab Collection. The colleague rediscovered the box earlier this year.

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Earlier this year, a scientific study claimed that shed a new light on the decades-long mystery of what happened to Earhart.

Richard Jantz, professor emeritus of anthropology at the University of Tennessee, argued that the bones found in the Pacific island of Nikumaroro in 1940 were probably Earhart’s remains. The research contradicts a forensic analysis of the remains in 1941, described the bones as belonging to a man. The bones, which were then lost, continue to be a source of discussion.

The first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean, Earhart was one of the most famous people in the world at the time of her disappearance. A number of theories have emerged about its fate.

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A much-debated theory is that Earhart died as a castaway after landing her plane on the remote island of Nikumaroro, a coral atoll, 1,200 miles from the Marshall Islands. A 13-human bones were found on Nikumaroro known as Gardner Island, three years after Earhart’s disappearance.

In this May 20, 1937 photo, which by The Paragon Agency,shows aviator Amelia Earhart and her Electra plane, taken by Albert Bresnik at the Burbank Airport in Burbank, California. It was a clear spring day in 1937 when Amelia Earhart, ready to make history by flying around the world, brought her personal photographer to a small Southern California airport to the document of the journey is the beginning. (Albert Bresnik/The Paragon Agency via AP)

While some people are convinced that Nikumaroro is Earhart’s final resting place, another theory suggests that she met her end on Mili Atoll in the Marshall Islands.

Last year, controversy swirled around a picture that was touted as providing a vital idea to Earhart’s fate.

The Associated Press contributed to this article.

Follow James Rogers on Twitter @jamesjrogers

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