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Alabama public schools can be quickly adding ‘In God We Trust’ gives

State Rep. David Standridge, R-Hayden, sponsored the original legislation that gives public institutions the right to display the “In God We Trust” motto. The Alabama law was effective from 1 July. (Twitter / Rep David Standridge@JudgeStandridge)

Public school officials in Alabama are looking for God back in their schools by means of displays of the AMERICAN motto “In God We Trust” — but critics are speaking out against the move, calling it “a constant push for the theocracy.”

State lawmakers in February approved legislation allowing such displays on public property. The motto will soon be able to becoming more common in Alabama schools, Al.com reported, with legal problems expected to follow.

Blount County school board is ready to be one of the first systems to take action, the news website reported. A policy problem can be set up within the next month, Superintendent Rodney Green said.

Observers view Blount County as a testing ground for the upcoming legal battle with organizations that advocate for the separation of church and state.

“You would think that something that passes the Legislature will not be challenged in the courtroom, but we all know that it can and probably will,” said Green, who oversees a school with more than 7,800 students, spread over 17 schools to the north of Jefferson County.

State Rep. David Standridge, R-Hayden, sponsored the original legislation that gives public institutions the right to display the “In God We Trust” motto. The Alabama law came into force from 1 July.

This article is about the “In God We Trust”, decision that I had the honor to sponsor. Political correctness has gone too far as our schools are afraid to have our national motto. https://t.co/u2N54iaJUX

— Rep David Standridge (@JudgeStandridge) August 10, 2018

The Alabama legislation is not a mandate, and is a lighter version of what was approved by Tennessee lawmakers this spring that required the motto’s prominent display in all public schools.

“My hope is that they are the Ten Commandments in the schools all over the state of Alabama as well as the declaration of independence, the Constitution and the historical documents that go with this country,” said Dean Young, chairman of the Ten Commandments and the political action committee. “That way, the children to see and ask, ‘What are these documents, and a teacher can say, ‘these are the Ten Commandments and they come from God and this is what they say.'”

The critics claim that the national politics, fueling efforts to include a motto or Christian symbols in government buildings.

“It is a tsunami of Christian national laws in our country now,” said Annie Laurie Gaylord, co-president of the Madison, Wisconsin-based Freedom from Religion Foundation.

“The forthcoming elections will say a lot about the direction of our country,” she added. “With the Republicans in the costs of the Congress, and many of these states, we see a constant push for the theocracy.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Frank Miles is a journalist and editor, covering sports, tech, military and geopolitical for FoxNews.com. He can be reached at Frank.Miles@foxnews.com.

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