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Air Force base, that produces for the first time, a certified 3D-printed parts in planes

to connectVideoAir Force, the innovation hub, is looking to help tech start-ups

In New Vegas the tech room for the businessmen in order to solve the problems of war, soldiers and airmen experience on the bases in the country.

The 60th Maintenance Squadron at Travis Air Force base in California has been at the forefront of a new effort to create 3D-printed plane parts.

The squadron was the first unit field in the air force, to be certified by an industrial-sized 3-d printer, which has allowed for the production of nonstructural aircraft components, according to a statement released on Monday.

The Stratasys F900 3-d printer that produces parts up to a 36-by-24-36 inches, and the air force, he said. With the use of a material called Ultem 9085, which is described as being stronger, richer, and more flexible than the traditional plastics.

The printer has been certified by the Federal Aviation Administration and the Air Force’s cutting-edge Technology and Training Center.

THE MARINES OF 3D-PRINTED CONCRETE HUTS IN JUST 40 HOURS

It took eight months to get the system fully operational.

Latrine has a cover on it, and the first plane, the parts are allowed to be used after the printing on the Stratasys F900 3-d printer will be on display Aug. 15, 2019 at the latest, at the Travis Air Force Base, California.
(U.s. Air Force photo by Louis Briscese)

The first approved project is to be printed, on the machine on Aug. 12 — replacement of pit latrine covers, for the C-5 Galaxy aircraft.

“The latrine cover, we will only be printed usually takes about a year from the time that they’ve been ordered to take the amount of time that they have made,” said Master Sgt. John Higgs, 60th MXS aircraft metals technology section chief, in a statement. “We have pushed two out of the covers, in 73 hours.”

THE MARINES OF 3D-PRINTED CONCRETE BRIDGE, UP TO 14 HOURS

The air force pointed out that the parts that do not hold the aircraft on the performance of their duties shall not be such a high priority for replacement.

U. S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Rogelio Lopez, 60th Maintenance Squadron assistant aircraft metals technology section chief, loads the Ultem 9085 material, a socket for use with the Stratasys F900, the three-dimensional printer, Feb. 15, 2019 At The Latest, Travis Air Force Base, California.
(U.s. Air Force photo by Louis Briscese)

The team is able to download the blueprints, which were approved by the University of Dayton, Research Institute, online database, used as part of the Joint Engineering Data Management Information Control System (JEDMICS).

“It presents us with an opportunity that we never had before,” Higgs said. “There are a lot of options for us at this time. We are just the tip of the iceberg.”

THE AIR FORCE’S ‘INNOVATION HUB’ SEEMS TO BE TO HELP TECH START-UPS

If it is the only Air Force to field a unit that is fully operational, it will be with the team, He has been receiving requests from other parts of the service.

An aircraft part that prints on the Stratasys F900, the three-dimensional printer, Feb. 15, 2019 at the latest, at the Travis Air Force Base, California.
(U.s. Air Force photo by Louis Briscese)

“We have already made a list of all the air force level, in order to help them to express and to backfill some of the supplies,” Higgs said in a statement. This will make sure that other alternatives may be to replace the items sooner than expected, thanks to our help.”

Last year the marine Corps is using a dedicated 3D concrete printer to a 500-square-meter barrack-room is a 40-hour, according to the marine Corps. It usually takes 10 in the Marines, five days before the construction of a military barracks hut made of wood.

ARMY OF THE ROBOT WILL BE AFTER IT FALLS DOWN

The building was built in August of 2018 to the U. s. Army Engineer Research and Development Center in Champaign, Illinois.

The army and the Navy Seabees were also involved in the construction effort.

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Last year, the Marines at Camp Pendleton, Calif. successfully 3D-printed a concrete bridge. The performance, which took place in December, for the first time in the united states of america or the Western hemisphere, that is, a bridge is a 3-d printed on-site, as opposed to in a manufacturing plant, according to the marine Corps.

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