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Adobe Flash flaw was being exploited in North Korea-linked hack

In this photo of the North Korean government, North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un delivers his new year’s speech at an undisclosed location in North Korea Monday, Jan. 1, 2018. Kim said Monday that the United States should be aware that his country’s nuclear forces are now a reality, not as a threat. Independent journalists have no access to coverage of the event depicted in this image distributed by the North Korean government. The content of this image is as intended, and can not be independently verified. Korean language watermark on the image, as determined by the source reads: “KCNA” that is the abbreviation for Korean Central News Agency. (Korean Central News Agency/Korea News Service via AP)

(KCNA via KNS)

Adobe Flash Player is a serious bug that North Korean hackers may have been exploiting to steal files from computers.

The previously unknown vulnerability, an attacker can trigger remote code execution via a PC. It has an impact on both the current version of the Adobe Flash Player (28.0.0.137), together with earlier versions.

On Thursday, Adobe Systems issued a security advisory warning that the bad actors were exploiting the bug “in limited, targeted attacks against Windows users.”

A security researcher has claimed that North Korea hackers are behind the attacks. Simon Choi, a director of the security company Hauri, tweeted that the attack occurred in the middle of November, and were aimed at South Koreans, who are conducting research on North Korea.

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Flash 0day vulnerability that North Korea used from mid-November 2017. They attacked the South Koreans, who mainly do research on North Korea. (still no patch) pic.twitter.com/bbjg1CKmHh

— Simon Choi (@issuemakerslab)
February 1, 2018

This article originally appeared on PCMag.com.

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