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A teenager diagnosed with an early menopause says that she is not ever ‘come to terms’ with a devastating diagnosis

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A teenager going through early menopause at the age of 15 is finding support with a group of girls who were diagnosed with similar conditions.

Annabelle, who lives in the united kingdom, shared her story on a recent edition of the “BBC Breakfast” morning program, admit that they don’t think they will ever fully come to terms” with the devastating diagnosis.

“I felt really alone,” said Annabelle, who also revealed she experiences hot flashes, and in general does not “feel comfortable in her environment.

“It really frustrates me, because you think, well, ‘Why me?’ And you really want to know why it happened,” Annabelle told the BBC.

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Early menopause is said to affect about 5 percent of women, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), and is classified as “early” if it occurs in women under the age of 40 years.

The HHS says smoking, or certain types of medications or treatments can cause early menopause, although in Annabelle’s case, doctors are not sure of the cause.

“It’s just this whole big mystery of what’s going on in my body,” said Annabelle, who now takes the hormone pills to control some of the symptoms and the hot flashes, The Sun reports.

Annabelle’s parents were devastated by the news, telling the BBC that it is difficult for them to think about what Annabelle goes, however, know that they will never be able to bear children.

“I had to break the news to her,” Annabelle’s mother said in the “BBC Breakfast” segment, as part of an ongoing series about the menopause and women’s health. “We both had a cry.”

Annabelle used to regret that she not someone her own age to talk to, although she was quickly connected with other girls who shared her condition via the Daisy Network, a support organization for girls and women with an early menopause, or premature ovarian insufficiency (POI).

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Annabelle said that despite her diagnosis, she has also learned to think about themselves happy, in a way.

“I don’t think I’ll ever come to terms with the whole,” she said. “Just trying to make something positive out of a negative, because there is always someone going through so much worse.

“And to think that there is someone going through something worse than me, you feel more happiness than anything.”

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