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A student discovered the long-lost 1000-year old stone monuments from the old kingdom

The 14-year-old student Mark McGettigan liked the medieval stone.
(© Martin Shields)

A 14-year-old student in Scotland has helped to discover a long-lost medieval stone sculptures in a church in the cemetery.

Mark McGettigan was taking part in a community dig to find the lost stones at Govan Old Parish church in Glasgow when he made the incredible discovery, according to a statement. The Lourdes High School felt something solid beneath the surface of the cemetery, which turned out to be the first of the three lost stones from the middle Ages.

The stones were previously thought to have been accidentally destroyed when a neighboring shipyard building was demolished in the 1970s.

LONG-LOST DARK AGE KINGDOM DISCOVERED IN THE SOUTH OF SCOTLAND

“I was just prodding the ground to see if there was something and suddenly made a sound and I realized that I had hit something,” McGettigan explains, in a statement. “For myself and two of the archaeologists worked in the area of the object and began to dig and clean.”

Dating from the 10th and 11th centuries, A. D., the stones are part of a historical collection known as the Govan Stones, and with crosses and Celtic designs. During the 19th century, 46 stones were found in the cemetery, 31, is now housed in Govan Old Parish church.

“I was not so sure in the beginning what it was,” McGettigan added. “But when we checked the data and we realized that it was one of the lost Govan Stones. I am very happy, but I am delighted of what I helped to discover.”

INCREDIBLE DISCOVERY SHEDS LIGHT ON ‘LOST PEOPLE’

Dating back to the ancient Kingdom of Strathclyde, archaeologists say that the Govan Stones cast a light on a dark period in history before Scotland existed. At that time, warlords fought for the control of the British Isles in the middle of the raids of the Vikings.

“This is the most exciting discovery we have had in Govan in the last 20 years,” said Stephen Driscoll, professor of historical archaeology at the University of Glasgow, and a member of the Govan Heritage Trust. “The Govan Stones are a collection of international importance, and this restored stone strengthen the case for regarding Govan as one of the most important early medieval centre of power”.

The tombs of the Old Govan Church was carried out by the charity Northlight Heritage as part of the ‘Stones and Bones’ community archaeology project involving Glasgow City Council and Govan Heritage Trust, which owns the Govan Old Parish church. The initiative is supported by the british National Lottery Heritage Fund.

‘TREASURE’ DISCOVERED AT THE OLD FORT DESTROYED BY THE VIKINGS

The stones are the latest fascinating historical find in Scotland. Last year, for example, a medieval structure, is considered as one of the world’s oldest whisky photos, discovered among the ruins of a Scottish abbey.

Mark McGettigan and Professor Stephen Driscoll University of Glasgow examine one of the stones was rediscovered in Govan Old Parish church.
(© Martin Shields)

Also in 2018, researchers on a remote Scottish island and found a stone anvil of the mysterious ancient Pictish people.

Elsewhere in Scotland, archaeologists have also the advantage of impressive finds. For example, a treasure trove of ancient artifacts was discovered last year at a fort by the archaeologists believe, was razed to the ground by the Vikings. Experts at the University of Aberdeen made the remarkable finds at Burghead in Scotland the northern coast of Moray. The fort, which was once used by the Picts, is described as the largest of its kind in Scotland.

MEDIEVAL WHISKEY STILL DISCOVERED AT THE SCOTTISH ABBEY, THE OLDEST IN THE WORLD

In 2017, archaeologists and volunteers is also the location of a lost early medieval kingdom in the south of Scotland. In another project, a rare Roman coin was found on a remote Scottish island.

(From left to right) Nicola Reid, field archaeolgist, Northlight Heritage; Mark McGettigan; Megan Cabinets, project office and volunteer, Northlight Heritage and Ingrid Shearer, community involvement officer for “Stones & Bones” to unearth, Northlight Heritage, to look into one of the three Govan Stones was rediscovered in Govan Old Parish church.
(© Martin Shields)

In 2014, a wonderful treasure of old silver, supposed to have been used as bribes by the Romans, was found with a metal detector by a teenager in Dairsie, in the Scottish region of Fife.

Experts in Scotland have also 3-D technology to reconstruct the face of an 18th-century ‘witch.’

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However, archaeologists in Scotland have also recently found that a stone circle thought to be thousands of years old, is actually a modern replica.

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