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A part of the Grand Teton National Park near Yellowstone supervolcano closed after the gap open

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Dangerous gap is opened in the vicinity of Yellowstone supervolcano

What a dangerous gap to open in the vicinity of the Yellowstone supervolcano mean for the National Park and tourists.

Expansion of cracks and fissures in the Grand Teton National Park in Wyoming have prompted officials to close certain areas for tourists.

Hidden Falls and Inspiration Point are now closed to tourists because of possible danger to the safety, security and park rangers are initiating a risk assessment, according to a statement from the National Park Service.

Director David Vela said: “Human safety is our number one priority, and with an abundance of caution, we are temporarily closing this area until we can properly assess the situation.”

Hidden Falls, Grand Teton National Park, is shown above. A part of the park was closed due to large cracks and fissures that appeared.

(NPS)

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Although it is unclear how the cracks appeared, it may be the result of the seismic activity in the area.

Grand Teton National Park is located on top of the Yellowstone supervolcano, which last erupted 630,000 years ago and ejected 240 cubic miles of rock, ash and volcanic dust in the air and did a 34 km 50 km depression in the ground.

A view of Jenny Lake as seen from Inspiration Point, one of the areas that have been closed by Grand Teton National Park officials.

(NPS)

If there is an eruption of the Yellowstone supervolcano, which government officials and scientists have said is unlikely, the result would be a devastating amount of ash and sulfur spewed into the air. That could destroy crops and even alter the climate.

The powerful eruption of Tambura in 1815 lowered global temperatures, causing extreme weather conditions and led to crop failures.

The officials said that they do not know how long the closure stays in place.

Christopher Carbone is a reporter and news editor covering science and technology for FoxNews.com. He can be reached at christopher.carbone@foxnews.com. Follow him on Twitter @christocarbone.

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