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1,000-year-old ancient amulet discovered in Jerusalem the City of David

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Rare clay amulet discovered in the Town of David

Rare clay amulet with a personal blessing discovered in the City of David.

Archaeologists in Israel have unearthed an extremely rare old clay amulet with a blessing in Arabic.

The clay artifact, which dates back to the 9th or 10th century, was discovered during the excavations of a car park in the City of David archaeological site.

The small amulet, which is only 1 inch in size, features a two-line inscription in Arabic, which is a blessing, or a personal prayer. “Kareem trusts in Allah,” and “Lord of the Worlds, Allah,” it reads.

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“The size of the object, the shape and the text indicate that it was apparently used as an amulet for blessing and protection,” said excavation directors Prof. Yuval Gadot of Tel Aviv University and Dr. Yiftah Shalev of the Israel Antiquities Authority, in a statement.

Discovered concluded between plaster floor during the excavation of a small room, the amulet provides a fascinating glimpse into the life in Jerusalem during the early Islamic period. However, experts are not sure whether it was deliberately buried under the floor or simply lost by a man by the name of Kareem.

“Because this amulet is not for a hole to thread it on a string, we can assume that it was located in a piece of jewelry or placed in a kind of container.”

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While the shards of pottery and a lamp discovered in the neighbourhood of the amulet, dating from around 1,000 years, archaeologists are still uncertain how the site was used for. “The poor preservation of the architecture of the purpose of the structure is difficult to determine,” they said, in a statement. “It is interesting to note that a number of installations give to the cook of the activities that happened here. Humble structures of the same period were found in previous excavations at the site, including houses, interspersed with shops and workshops. It is reasonable to assume that this structure was used as part of the same industrial zone.”

Israel continues to reveal its archaeological secrets. In a separate project, experts discovered an ancient cemetery complex in the North of Israel, dating back to around 2000 years.

The rock-hewn burial cave was recently discovered during construction work in the city of Tiberias. Old robbers probably looted the cave, according to archaeologists.

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The cave, which dates back to the Roman period, was hidden in order to protect it, and it will be examined by experts of the Israel Antiquities Authority.

There are a number of fascinating discoveries in the region in recent years. Archaeologists in Israel, for example, have discovered that a site can provide new insights into the ancient biblical kingdom of David and Solomon. In another project, a treasure of bronze coins, the last remnants of an ancient Jewish revolt against the Roman Empire, were recently discovered near the temple mount in Jerusalem.

In February, archaeologists announced the discovery of a clay seal mark, that may bear the signature of the biblical Prophet Isaiah.

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Last November, there are new facts dated Christ’s tomb in Jerusalem, the Church of the Holy Tomb from the Roman period, matching historical records.

Other finds include the skeleton of a pregnant woman, dating back 3200 years, in Israel’s Timna Valley, a place once known as “King Solomon’s Mines.

On the site of an ancient city on the West Bank, archaeologists are also hunting for evidence of the tabernacle, which once housed the Ark of the Covenant.

Some experts also believe they have the lost Roman city of Julias, formerly the village of Bethsaida, which was the home of Jesus’ apostles, Peter, Andrew and Philip.

Follow James Rogers on Twitter @jamesjrogers

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